Creative Activities to Support Visually Impaired Children in Child Care Programs

Activity1.jpgPracticing Using a Braille Square

  • The child counts 1-3 down the left side of the muffin pan and 4-6 down the right side. I glued in rubber circles inside the pan to indicate the number in order for the child to learn the feeling represented as braille dots.
  • The child places the balls in order 1-6. Once he’s mastered that skill, challenge him by asking him to hand back the balls in a random order (eg. ask for number 4, then 6, then 2, until done).

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One Without the Other: Stories of Unity Through Diversity and Inclusion

Book_OneWithout.jpgOne Without the Other: Stories of unity through diversity and inclusion is a truly inspiring book authored by Shelley Moore (foreword by Leyton Schnellert). In this book, Shelley Moore takes readers on her journey in discovering the meaning of inclusion and diversity. She shares her own personal experiences in the classroom (as a student herself and as a professional today), helping and inspiring readers to understand and embrace diversity and inclusion. Continue reading

What is Five Moore Minutes?

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30741897_2118117931805530_4523879709701560504_nInspired by a little bowling video…Five Moore Minutes is a website with videos dedicated to empowering schools and classrooms to support ALL Learners! Created by Shelley Moore, this website is designed with teachers in mind. As educators, we don’t always have a lot of time, so this website and video series offers resources, research, professional development activities and inspiration in 5 minute chunks!

Click here to watch the project’s video introduction!

www.fivemooreminutes.com

Hope and Expectations of a Mom

Ewan_1.jpgHope is something I will always have. Hope for a better day tomorrow. Hope for applying what I have learned today to tomorrow’s challenges. Being a mother of a child with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) has ensured that I will always have hope.

My son Ewan is a beacon of hope. I won’t lie. It’s not easy to see his peers moving through developmental stages at a totally different pace than him. What is encouraging is that he makes progress each and every day. His progress has taught me to not rule anything out. It’s not been a matter of IF Ewan will learn something/how to do something, but WHEN. He has his own schedule that keeps advancing, just at a slower pace.

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Raising a Sensory Smart Child

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Lindsay Biel and Nancy Peske

A winner of the NAPPA Gold Award and iParenting Media award, this book provides a complete analysis of sensory issues and strategies. For caregivers, educators and parents, it is a worthwhile read to better understand the complex nature of sensory disorders. The authors break down the causes of sensory issues and the way that they can interfere with child development and participation in daily activities.  Continue reading

Seeing the Individual Child and Building Connections Using Conscious Discipline®

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The most important part of operating any child care program is to create an environment that provides comfort and a sense of community. School Age programs are often run in shared spaces, and so the flexibility in the environment is not as feasible as it would be in a permanent space. This encourages staff to think about the materials and structures that they can bring in, and the learning opportunities that they can provide to help meet the needs of each child. Using structures from Conscious Discipline® has guided our program in creating an environment that everyone feels a part of, and the individual child is acknowledged and supported.

We believe it is essential to make a point of greeting each child by name. Most of the children will opt to give us a high five or fist pump with the greeting, and some children choose to have a no touch greeting. Whatever the child chooses, the emphasis is on personal acknowledgment and a recognition that we are happy they are here. When there are a larger number of children in our care, too often we can lose track of names or specific personal details of the children.

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