Category Archives: Families

Transition to School

Resource Consultants at CISS are fortunate to support parents with transitioning their child to school. This year, when mentioning the word “enrollment” more parents than previous years have been questioning whether their child should begin their journey to school. We empathize with parents that the uncertainty of what September will bring can be daunting. We recognize that this year is definitely more overwhelming than most for families to work through the transition to school process. But overwhelming doesn’t mean impossible!

We are here to support you. In addition to our newly improved Transition to School Toolkit, we’ve created a tip sheet addressing common transition to school concerns. Please see the links below to related articles and resources and connect with your Resource Consultant to begin the transition to school conversation.

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Take Turns with your Child to Build Strong Communication Skills

Communication starts at birth. Parents who talk to their baby, observe, follow, and play with their children play a crucial role in supporting communication development. One important skill is turn-taking. Turn-taking skills are an integral part of communication in young children.

What exactly is “turn-taking” skills?

Turn-taking skills can be compared to the ultimate “ping-pong” communication game.  It involves the back-and-forth interaction between two people, between you and your child.  Turn-taking skills are the foundation to healthy attachment and communication skills.  Turn-taking skills are built into “serve-and-return” interactions that are so important to build a child’s brain. When you and your baby are actively engaged and practice taking turns during sound play imitation, a peek-a-boo game, chatting, you are laying the foundation for later conversation. 

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Outdoor Winter Heavy Work Activities for Kids

Providing deep proprioceptive sensory input through heavy work is a great way to calm your child’s body and there are lots of different heavy work activities that your child can do.

But maybe you’re looking for something new for your child to do since it’s winter?

This list of winter heavy work activities for kids to do outdoors in the snow is a great starting point if you are looking to sneak in some extra sensory diet activities this winter. So bundle those kids up and head outdoors for these simple, yet effective heavy work ideas!

Here’s a list of 20 fun ways for kids to sneak in some heavy work while playing outdoors in the snow:

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Strategies to Help Your Child Speak Clearly

By Roxane Bélanger, M.O.A., SLP-C, Reg. CALSPO
Speech Language Pathologist,
First Words Preschool Speech and Language Program of Ottawa and Renfrew County

During the pandemic, many parents and educators are wondering how to support children who are learning to speak and use new sounds. Wearing a mask and accessing therapy services can cause concerns for parents with a child presenting with speech sounds difficulty. Many tools and strategies are at your fingertips.

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Mindfulness

Nowadays, life can be hard, hectic and stressful. Moreover, everyday life during a pandemic increases our stress levels which can impact our well-being. Right now, we are facing constant distractions, such as social media, and we are worried about what the future holds.

We feel our mind jumping from one idea to another without stopping. So I asked myself a question … How can we regain our balance and catch our breath to calm our mind?

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Big Feelings Come and Go Storybook

This storybook teaches kids about freeze, flight and fight and helps them learn some basic self-regulation skills. Understanding freeze, flight and fight can allow for new conversations about how your child feels and what to do to help them manage their big feelings.

Borrow this book from our CISS Resource Library

Download the Free PDF
(available in 6 languages)

View 4-part videos series
(Freeze, Flight, Fight, Settle)

Masks On. Let’s talk!

We live in an unprecedented time. Information and research on mask-wearing and its impact on child development are limited. To be frank: there is almost none. As new information trickles in, parents and adults working with children have to make the best decision based on the information at hand at the time, even if we wish we had more information to better guide us.

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