Category Archives: Resources

Summer Activities in the Area

The summer is upon us and we often ask ourselves, what activities are available in our area? We thought of offering you a list of activities located in the national capital region. You will also find some free activities.

Museums:
*Please check museum websites for effective dates.

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Choosing Naia – A Family’s Journey

choosingNaia2.jpgThis is a beautifully written book about a family’s most difficult choice during pregnancy. Choosing Naia is a very detailed account of a family’s choice to continue their pregnancy when they are faced with uncertainty. Not only is Naia’s story explained with fear, excitement, and love but many facts about Down Syndrome and the true love it can bring you are shared throughout this read.

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How To Talk So Little Kids Will Listen

A Survival Guide to Life with Children Ages 2-7
By Joanna Faber and Julie King

Book_May_EN“A Survival Guide to life with little children!”  Could this be true?

I am a mom of a lively 3 year old boy and a Resource Consultant (RC) who supports parents and Early Childhood Educators. I am thankful that I came across this book at our CISS resource library. Not only does it align with the practices used amongst our team of RC’s it also offers an abundance of fun, effective, concrete tools and tips that I couldn’t wait to begin implementing with my son and within my RC role.  Continue reading

Why are visuals important to use in your program?

Visuals are a tool to visually convey messages and ensure they are understood.

The purpose of visuals is:

  • To capture and sustain attention
  • To facilitate comprehension
  • To promote expressive communication
  • To organize physical space and material
  • To develop autonomy
  • To develop play and social skills
  • To encourage desired behaviour

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Speaking of Apraxia: A Parents’ Guide to Childhood Apraxia of Speech

Speaking of apraxiaSpeaking of Apraxia by Leslie A Lindsay is an easy-to-read comprehensive guide geared towards parents who have a child diagnosed with Apraxia. Apraxia is a motor-speech disorder characterized by difficulty in planning correct speech sounds in the brain and communicating them in the proper sequence to the speech muscles. Written by a parent whose child was diagnosed with Apraxia, this book walks parents through the typical stages of receiving a diagnosis, accessing Speech and Language resources, and transitioning to school.  The author uses current research as well as their personal experience to inform the reader without overwhelming them with jargon or professional lingo.

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What to Include in a Calm Down Kit

The purpose of creating a calm down area is to provide a space to support the child in learning to self-regulate. It is a safe place for a child to take a break away from a stimulus that is causing stress, anxiety or anger (e.g., loud noises, having to share, feeling tired, or being excited). The child learns to identify overwhelming feelings and step away to regain self-control. Through this process the child engages in calming and relaxing activities and, once calm, is able to return to the activity or routine in progress. A calm down area should never be used as a time out or as a punishment.

There are a lot of different things you can include in a calm down kit and you will want to tailor it to your child(ren) and ensure the calm down area is supervised at all times. The kit should be readily available for both indoor and outdoor and can include: Continue reading

Have You Filled a Bucket Today?

Have you filled a bucket today.jpgThis uplifting book was the winner of 8 Mom’s Choice Awards. It is a great reminder for everyone about the importance of kindness and lifting each other up. I referenced a lot of thoughts and ideas that I had while reading this book during several conversations with educators in school age programs. It made me think about positive group reinforcements for being kind to one another every day. Through conversations with both the educators and children, we came up with an idea to have physical buckets for each child in the program and a big jar of pom poms to put in another child’s bucket when someone noticed them doing something nice for a peer, or just being kind throughout the afternoon. Continue reading